SEER is useful for comparing one model to another much in the same way that a car's calculate MPG is useful. It's not an accurate prediction of exactly how efficient the system is, but it can tell you which one is more efficient. Also, since SEER is based on a "cooling season", what region you live in will determine how long or short your cooling season is.
The condensed, pressurized, and still usually somewhat hot liquid refrigerant is next routed through an expansion valve (often nothing more than a pinhole in the system's copper tubing) where it undergoes an abrupt reduction in pressure. That pressure reduction results in flash evaporation of a part of the liquid refrigerant, greatly lowering its temperature. The cold refrigerant is then routed through the evaporator. A fan blows the interior warm air (which is to be cooled) across the evaporator, causing the liquid part of the cold refrigerant mixture to evaporate as well, further lowering the temperature. The warm air is therefore cooled and is pumped by an exhaust fan/ blower into the room. To complete the refrigeration cycle, the refrigerant vapor is routed back into the compressor. In order for the process to have any efficiency, the cooling/evaporative portion of the system must be separated by some kind of physical barrier from the heating/condensing portion, and each portion must have its own fan to circulate its own "kind" of air (either the hot air or the cool air).
Air conditioners often use a fan to distribute the conditioned air to an occupied space such as a building or a car to improve thermal comfort and indoor air quality. Electric refrigerant-based AC units range from small units that can cool a small bedroom, which can be carried by a single adult, to massive units installed on the roof of office towers that can cool an entire building. The cooling is typically achieved through a refrigeration cycle, but sometimes evaporation or free cooling is used. Air conditioning systems can also be made based on desiccants (chemicals which remove moisture from the air) and subterraneous pipes that can distribute the heated refrigerant to the ground for cooling.[2]
The main purpose of your furnace filter is to ensure that none of the additional materials your fans pull back into the unit - such as hair and dust - actually damage the furnace or its parts. In the process, it also improves air quality in your home. Some annual inspections will include changing and cleaning this part of the unit. That said, you can also clean or change your furnace filteryourself. Costs for new filters range based on brand, but tend to be around $30.
The use of CFC as a refrigerant was once common, including the refrigerants R-11 and R-12 (sold under the brand name Freon-12). Freon refrigerants were commonly used during the 20th century in air conditioners due to their superior stability and safety properties. When they are released accidentally or deliberately, these chlorine-bearing refrigerants eventually reach the upper atmosphere.[60] Once the refrigerant reaches the stratosphere, UV radiation from the Sun homolytically cleaves the chlorine-carbon bond, yielding a chlorine radical. These chlorine radicals catalyze the breakdown of ozone into diatomic oxygen, depleting the ozone layer that shields the Earth's surface from strong UV radiation. Each chlorine radical remains active as a catalyst until it binds with another radical, forming a stable molecule and quenching the chain reaction.

Baker Brothers Air Conditioning company offers residential HVAC services including a/c and air conditioning repair, a/c and air conditioning replacement, a/c and air conditioning installation, a/c and air conditioning tune up, a/c and air conditioning inspections, a/c and air conditioning maintenance on air conditioning units and systems in most or all of the following Dallas, TX ZIP Codes: 75229, 75230, 75225, 75220, 75209, 75219, 75247, 75212, 75235, 75201, 75207, 75248, 75287, 75252, 75244, 75254, 75240, 75251, 75248-1713, 75214, 75228, 75243, 75238, 75218, 75206, 75231, 75204, 75226, 75246, 75227, 75208, 75217, 75232, 75224, 75211, 75241, 75215, 75233, 75253, 75216, 75223, 75237, 75249, 75203, 75210
A true central air-conditioning system uses ducts to distribute cooled air throughout the house. In a “split system,” the most common design, refrigerant circulates between an indoor coil and a matching—meaning from the same brand—outdoor condenser with compressor (see illustration, below). The refrigerant cools the air, dehumidifying it in the process; a blower circulates air through ducts throughout the house. A thermostat maintains the temperature at the setting you select. A variation is the “heat pump,” a type of system that functions as heater and air conditioner.
This describes how much cooling the unit delivers for each watt of electricity. Efficiency is expressed as the seasonal energy-efficiency rating, or SEER. The minimum SEER for a split system central air conditioner allowed today is 14, so look for units with SEER ratings of 15 or greater. The higher the SEER, the more you can lower your energy costs.
Packaged terminal heat pumps (PTHP) are are similar to a window-mounted air conditioner. These units are typically installed in a sleeve passing through the outdoor wall of an apartment, hotel, school classroom, etc. PTHPs are completely self contained and require only an electrical connection in addition to the opening in the building shell. They use the outdoor air as the heat source in winter and as a heat sink in summer. They also can provide ventilation air. Flexibility and lower installed cost are the primary advantages of the PTHP. Disadvantages include in-room maintenance, higher operating cost, relatively short life, imprecise "on-off" temperature control, and they can be rather noisy.

*Residential Service call's subject to $119.00 travel and diagnostic fee, Commercial Service call's subject to a $149.00 travel and diagnostic fee. Once diagnosed, necessary repairs will be quoted in accordance with standard flat rate repair price. Repair and quoted repair price may be accepted or declined by the customer at that time. Travel and Diagnostic fee will still apply in case customer declines repair. All calls are C.O.D. Overtime rates for Residential Service are $169.00, overtime rates for Commercial services are $179.00.  These rates are for services performed after normal business hours Monday through Friday 8am-4:30pm.


Start with your utility company; they can help a great deal. Comparing previous bills isn't always a good measure, as the weather is never exactly the same month to month. Instead, if you take your energy bill and divide it by the square footage of livable space in your home, don't count areas like unfinished garages or basements -- you can calculate how much you are spending to heat or cool each square foot of your home. Your energy provider can tell you what the average cost per square foot is in your region for that same period of time so you can compare apples to apples.
Rheem's RRNL features a scroll compressor with fewer moving parts and less noise than traditional reciprocating compressors. A louvered compressor compartment protects the compressor from the elements and from debris that can shorten the life of the compressor. The Classic series continues to be one of their best sellers, with the addition of the Comfort Alert diagnostics module integrated to assist technicians in the event your system needs repair. 2-5 tons, 13 SEER, 80% AFUE.
A packaged system is a single unit combining all the components described in the split system. Since the unit is a package, it must be placed outside the building and indoor air is “ducted” from the building to the packaged system and back through an air distribution system. These units typically have SEER rating from 10 to 18. If heating is required, an alternate method of heating the interior of the building must be used, usually in the form of electric or gas heating.
While there's nothing you can do to guarantee your air conditioner or furnace will never need repairs, there are ways to take better care of your system. Changing out the air filters every 3-6 months, making sure nothing is obstructing or interfering with the outside unit, and keeping all vents unblocked in well-used rooms will help keep your air conditioning and heating system operating efficiently.
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