A more efficient method of controlling humidity is to use the waste heat from the refrigeration cycle itself. Instead of rejecting the waste heat outdoors, the heat is directed inside when humidity control is required. One form of heat reclaim is called hot-gas reheat or “refrigerant desuperheating” where refrigerant is passed through a heat exchanger located downstream of the cooling coil. The hot high pressure vapor leaving the compressor passes through this heat exchanger prior to entering the condenser coil. This in turn heats the indoor air and again causes the AC system to run longer to meet the thermostat set point. Although more energy is used, this is much more efficient than turning on an electric heater. Another form of heat reclaim is called sub-cool reheat. This strategy takes the warm liquid refrigerant from the condenser and passes it through a heat exchanger located downstream of the cooling coil. Less heat is available using this method because the majority of the heat has already been rejected at the condenser. Since more energy is used to pump liquid (as opposed to a gas) through the heat exchanger it would appear that this method is less efficient than the hot-gas method, however, the liquid in the heat exchanger is sub-cooled in the cold supply air stream which increases the capacity of the air conditioner. Since more capacity is available, the AC units is able to meet the thermostat more quickly.
Cleaning the debris that builds up on your filters will aid with the flow of air. When your air filter is clogged, your air handler must work harder to compensate for the blockage of air flow. In addition to driving up your utility bill, the reduced air flow through your heating and cooling system can cause your heat exchanger to overheat and shut off too quickly.    
There are a number of claims in the HVAC industry that make HVAC technicians sound like they know what they are doing, but the North American Technician Excellence (NATE) certification program is the only closed book examination and certification program, administered by a third party, that tests real world working knowledge of HVAC systems. That's why all of our service technicians complete and continue NATE certification training throughout their career with SMO.
We are open from 7am to 10pm every weekday and from 7am to 8pm on weekends. We book appointments in a 2 hour arrival window and call 30-45 mins before we arrive so you do not have to sit around waiting. It is often possible to schedule your appointment in the evening or morning hours to avoid conflicting with your work schedule. Are you looking for service today? Give us a call or click on one of the Schedule Service buttons found on the top and left sides of this page to contact us today.
In 1906, Stuart W. Cramer of Charlotte was exploring ways to add moisture to the air in his textile mill. Cramer coined the term "air conditioning", using it in a patent claim he filed that year as an analogue to "water conditioning", then a well-known process for making textiles easier to process. He combined moisture with ventilation to "condition" and change the air in the factories, controlling the humidity so necessary in textile plants. Willis Carrier adopted the term and incorporated it into the name of his company.[10]
Another precaution you can take to prolong the life of your central air unit is to cover it up during winter. Protect it from ice and snow by putting a sheet of plastic or wood on top of the unit. However, only cover the top and not the whole machine. You don't want to trap moisture that could cause it to rust and you don't want to provide a hiding spot for pests.
An air conditioner's compressor contains a refrigerant. As it works, it sends this refrigerant through the system. As warm air blows across the coil that carries this refrigerant, the heat transfers to the refrigerant (cool always absorbs warm). A fan moves the cooled air through the ducting and out of vents that lead into the rooms of your house. The refrigerant returns to the compressor where the absorbed heat is moved outside. The refrigerant is then sent through the coil once again to continue the cycle.

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