HVAC is an important part of residential structures such as single family homes, apartment buildings, hotels and senior living facilities, medium to large industrial and office buildings such as skyscrapers and hospitals, on ships and submarines, and in marine environments, where safe and healthy building conditions are regulated with respect to temperature and humidity, using fresh air from outdoors.
Many disconnect blocks contain two cartridge fuses. Check them before you proceed with repairs (Photo 3). A blown fuse is a sign of a failing part inside the condensing unit. So don’t just replace it and think you’ve solved the problem. Instead, replace the parts we show here. Then install new fuses and fire up the unit. If it blows again, call a pro—you’ve got more serious issues.
Compressor -- Compressors are outdoor components in your system. The compressor is the pump that circulates the refrigerants through the air-conditioner. You can hear it when it's running so you'll know if it's working just by listening. If it starts getting louder, your compressor is about to fail. If it makes no sound when it should be on, it has already failed. Compressors fail for a number of reasons. Most often they fail due to strain from another failed part such as the fan motor. Electrical storms can also damage compressors. If the sound from the compressor gets louder or if you see a decrease in performance, you should have your compressor checked. A failed compressor will not heat or cool your house.
The thermocouple is a copper rod that the pilot flame heats-up. When it gets hot enough, the thermocouple signals that there is enough heat to burn the gas fuel being released into the appliance—and so it allows the gas to be released to the burners. In some cases where the pilot light won’t stay lit, the thermocouple needs to be adjusted or replaced. This is generally a job for a professional.
Split ductless systems have an outside condenser and compressor, and one to four or more indoor blower units, called air handlers, mounted high on the wall that distribute air. The indoor and outdoor sections are connected by a thin conduit that houses the power cable, refrigerant tubing, and a condensate drain. The conduit is run through about a 3-inch hole hidden behind each air handler. Each air handler cools the room in which it’s installed, and you set the temperature with a remote control. Split ductless systems can be more expensive than window air conditioners, and professional installation is recommended. While not technically central air, the cooling they provide can feel like a central air system.
Air conditioning is common in the US, with 88% of new single-family homes constructed in 2011 including air conditioning, ranging from 99% in the South to 62% in the West.[50] In Canada, air conditioning use varies by province. In 2013, 55% of Canadian households reported having an air conditioner, with high use in Manitoba (80%), Ontario (78%), Saskatchewan (67%), and Quebec (54%) and lower use in Prince Edward Island (23%), British Columbia (21%), and Newfoundland and Labrador (9%).[51] In Europe, home air conditioning is generally less common. Southern European countries such as Greece have seen a wide proliferation of home air-conditioning units in recent years.[52] In another southern European country, Malta, it is estimated that around 55% of households have an air conditioner installed.[53] In India AC sales have dropped by 40%[clarification needed] due to higher costs and stricter energy efficiency regulations.[54]
The cost of a new furnace might make you balk at first thought, but with modern manufacturers offering an extremely diverse range of options with varying AFUE ratings, optional accessories, and more, there is a furnace to meet any budget! It’s just important that you work with the right service team and experts that will work with you rather than try to “sell” you.
James Harrison's first mechanical ice-making machine began operation in 1851 on the banks of the Barwon River at Rocky Point in Geelong, Australia. His first commercial ice-making machine followed in 1853, and his patent for an ether vapor compression refrigeration system was granted in 1855. This novel system used a compressor to force the refrigeration gas to pass through a condenser, where it cooled down and liquefied. The liquefied gas then circulated through the refrigeration coils and vaporized again, cooling down the surrounding system. The machine produced 3,000 kilograms (6,600 lb) of ice per day.[citation needed]
Strongsville Heating & Air Conditioning simplifies the challenges of keeping a perfectly comfortable home. We provide convenience, cost-savings, and reliability using top of the line products, premium materials, highly skilled technicians and exceptional customer service. Whether you need a new heating/cooling installation, replacement, retrofit, routine maintenance, trustworthy repair or air quality options, count on our team of NATE-certified technicians to eliminate stress and maximize comfort. We protect your busy schedule with flexible appointments, prompt arrival and mess free completion. Strongsville Heating & Air Conditioning is always available to you for Emergency Service, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year across Strongsville & Surrounding Areas.
A true central air-conditioning system uses ducts to distribute cooled air throughout the house. In a “split system,” the most common design, refrigerant circulates between an indoor coil and a matching—meaning from the same brand—outdoor condenser with compressor (see illustration, below). The refrigerant cools the air, dehumidifying it in the process; a blower circulates air through ducts throughout the house. A thermostat maintains the temperature at the setting you select. A variation is the “heat pump,” a type of system that functions as heater and air conditioner.
We are totally committed to your comfort. Our quality technicians set our business apart by providing the best and most professional service in the area. We are fully trained on today’s HVAC technology systems and methods, so when we are in your home or business, you can rest assured that we’ll work quickly and skillfully toward your total comfort.

Start with your utility company; they can help a great deal. Comparing previous bills isn't always a good measure, as the weather is never exactly the same month to month. Instead, if you take your energy bill and divide it by the square footage of livable space in your home, don't count areas like unfinished garages or basements -- you can calculate how much you are spending to heat or cool each square foot of your home. Your energy provider can tell you what the average cost per square foot is in your region for that same period of time so you can compare apples to apples.
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