First off, HVAC stands for “Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning,” while AC stands for just the last part: “Air Conditioning.” In other words, when we talk about AC, we’re generally talking about the system that cools the air in your home (although sometimes people do use the term AC to refer to units that provide heat as well, especially when they’re talking about heat pumps). However, when we talk about HVAC, we could be talking about a system that does either the heating or the cooling, or both.
Outdoor Fan Motor -- The outdoor fan, also called the condenser fan, is exposed to external conditions. As such it is most prone to dust and debris and the extreme weather. In desert climates, the outdoor fan motor is subject to heat not only from normal operation but from the outside temperature as well. As it starts to fail, the fan may work fine in the cooler morning hours but stop by afternoon. This can shut down the entire system for hours. When they stop running completely, your air conditioner will no longer work. Running a faulty fan will lead to compressor failure, which is a very costly repair.
You can install the greatest HVAC system ever built, but if your house is not insulated well, it's only going to end up costing you more money. Older homes may have fiberglass insulation that has broken down due to pests, moisture, or improper installation. Spray foam insulation can be damaged by careless repair or modification work or can be improperly installed. If your insulation in compromised, your attempts to save money and be comfortable will be in vain.
A packaged system is a single unit combining all the components described in the split system. Since the unit is a package, it must be placed outside the building and indoor air is “ducted” from the building to the packaged system and back through an air distribution system. These units typically have SEER rating from 10 to 18. If heating is required, an alternate method of heating the interior of the building must be used, usually in the form of electric or gas heating.
2Be sure the furnace’s circuit breaker is on or that its fuse has not blown. Check both the main electrical panel and any secondary subpanels that supply power to the unit. If the circuit has blown or tripped, reset the circuit breaker by flipping it all the way off and then on again. Or replace the fuse. If the circuit blows again, there is probably a short in the electrical system providing power to the furnace. For this, you may need to call an electrical contractor.
If you believe that the ac not working or you’re getting little or no cold air, check these three things first. Make sure all the registers in the house are wide open. Then be sure the furnace filter is clean. Then go outside and clean off the condenser coils (Photo 2). If several registers were closed or the filter was clogged, the reduced airflow could have caused the evaporator coil to ice up and stop cooling your home. If you’ve changed the filter and opened all the registers and you’re still not getting airflow at the registers, deice the A-coil. Move the thermostat mode switch from “Cooling” to “Off” and move the fan switch from “Auto” to “On.” Let the blower run for at least 30 minutes or until there’s good airflow at the registers. Then turn the AC back on to test it. If it works for the next 12 hours, you’ve solved the problem.
Absorption refrigerator Air barrier Air conditioning Antifreeze Automobile air conditioning Autonomous building Building insulation materials Central heating Central solar heating Chilled beam Chilled water Constant air volume (CAV) Coolant Dedicated outdoor air system (DOAS) Deep water source cooling Demand-controlled ventilation (DCV) Displacement ventilation District cooling District heating Electric heating Energy recovery ventilation (ERV) Firestop Forced-air Forced-air gas Free cooling Heat recovery ventilation (HRV) Hybrid heat Hydronics HVAC Ice storage air conditioning Kitchen ventilation Mixed-mode ventilation Microgeneration Natural ventilation Passive cooling Passive house Radiant heating and cooling system Radiant cooling Radiant heating Radon mitigation Refrigeration Renewable heat Room air distribution Solar air heat Solar combisystem Solar cooling Solar heating Thermal insulation Underfloor air distribution Underfloor heating Vapor barrier Vapor-compression refrigeration (VCRS) Variable air volume (VAV) Variable refrigerant flow (VRF) Ventilation

Nothing is worse than having your furnace fail on the coldest night of the year. When your furnace needs a repair, you shouldn’t have to worry about the company providing your furnace repair services. You won’t have to – not when you give John Betlem Heating & Cooling a call. No matter what kind of furnace you own, our talented team of technicians are able to easily identify any problem your furnace might be having.
Need 24-hour emergency furnace repair? We can provide that too. With our same-day service and live phone and online chat service available 24/7, we make your comfort our greatest priority. Heating and air conditioning should help you live a comfortable life, so let us help you make your home the most comfortable it has ever been. It’s easy, just grab your furnace repair coupon, then simply give us a call at 301-747-3140, chat or schedule an appointment with us online.
Natural ventilation is a key factor in reducing the spread of airborne illnesses such as tuberculosis, the common cold, influenza and meningitis. Opening doors, windows, and using ceiling fans are all ways to maximize natural ventilation and reduce the risk of airborne contagion. Natural ventilation requires little maintenance and is inexpensive.[19]

While there's nothing you can do to guarantee your air conditioner or furnace will never need repairs, there are ways to take better care of your system. Changing out the air filters every 3-6 months, making sure nothing is obstructing or interfering with the outside unit, and keeping all vents unblocked in well-used rooms will help keep your air conditioning and heating system operating efficiently.

Furnace RepairCompany

×