An air conditioning system, or a standalone air conditioner, provides cooling and humidity control for all or part of a building. Air conditioned buildings often have sealed windows, because open windows would work against the system intended to maintain constant indoor air conditions. Outside, fresh air is generally drawn into the system by a vent into the indoor heat exchanger section, creating positive air pressure. The percentage of return air made up of fresh air can usually be manipulated by adjusting the opening of this vent. Typical fresh air intake is about 10%.
Air conditioners come in two basic types—central and window. A central AC provides cooling to your entire home, while a window AC cools just the room where it’s installed. If you’re not using a heat pump, you can pair an air conditioner with a furnace to provide both heating and cooling. Just to make things a bit more confusing, a central air conditioner housed together with a furnace in a single cabinet is also known as a packaged unit!
In the refrigeration cycle, heat is transported from a colder location to a hotter area. As heat would naturally flow in the opposite direction, work is required to achieve this. A refrigerator is an example of such a system, as it transports the heat out of the interior and into its environment. The refrigerant is used as the medium which absorbs and removes heat from the space to be cooled and subsequently ejects that heat elsewhere.
Our Denver heating company understands that in our small part of the country, it is important that your heating system is maintained throughout the year to ensure it runs efficiently when you need it the most. Our specialists in heater repair in Denver recommend that your heating system is maintained at least once a year to spot potential problems before they have the chance to worsen and cause your system to fail at the worst possible time. At Brothers Plumbing, Heating, and Electric, our professionals are committed to diagnosing any problem your heating system may suffer while it still remains a minor repair.
Heaters are appliances whose purpose is to generate heat (i.e. warmth) for the building. This can be done via central heating. Such a system contains a boiler, furnace, or heat pump to heat water, steam, or air in a central location such as a furnace room in a home, or a mechanical room in a large building. The heat can be transferred by convection, conduction, or radiation.
Combustion gases are generated by the burners in your furnace and passed through a heat exchanger. Air from your home blows across the heat exchanger to be warmed. It is then blown through a system of ducts to distribute around your home. During warm seasons your heating system works with your central air conditioning. Air is cooled as it’s blown over your air conditioning unit’s cooling coil, often attached to the air circulating fan of the furnace, and then sent through the same air ducts throughout your home.
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Your comfort is a priority for us. A large part of comfortable living in Cary is not only having a functioning HVAC system, it’s also understanding who to call when you have a problem. If your air conditioner starts to fail in the middle of the Cary summer, you don’t have to stay at a friend’s for weeks on end. Or if your heater goes out during a blizzard, you don’t have to dig your heaviest blankets out of the basement. Instead, you can make an appointment with a member of our team and have him or her resolve your concerns. There is no problem in Cary you can encounter that we can’t work with you to solve. You can feel confident in knowing that you’re in qualified hands.


A specialized air conditioner that is used only for dehumidifying is called a dehumidifier. It also uses a refrigeration cycle, but differs from a standard air conditioner in that both the evaporator and the condenser are placed in the same air path. A standard air conditioner transfers heat energy out of the room because its condenser coil releases heat outside. However, since all components of the dehumidifier are in the same room, no heat energy is removed. Instead, the electric power consumed by the dehumidifier remains in the room as heat, so the room is actually heated, just as by an electric heater that draws the same amount of power.

Another HVAC system used for central heating is the heat pump. A heat pump is a single unit that provides both heating and cooling. Heat pumps can be split or packaged. If the unit is split, that means the evaporator coil is housed in a cabinet inside of your house, while the rest of the unit is in a separate cabinet outside. On the other hand, with a packaged unit the entire heat pump is housed in a metal cabinet outside.


"Very impressed. Returned call within 24 hours. They came out the same day I spoke with them and made the repair within 25 minutes. Very low service call fee. I had another repair service out two weeks earlier and after 3 service calls and the central air still not fixed and temperatures in the high 90's, it was such a relief to have a company identify the problem, have the necessary part with them and fix the problem."
A true central air-conditioning system uses ducts to distribute cooled air throughout the house. In a “split system,” the most common design, refrigerant circulates between an indoor coil and a matching—meaning from the same brand—outdoor condenser with compressor (see illustration, below). The refrigerant cools the air, dehumidifying it in the process; a blower circulates air through ducts throughout the house. A thermostat maintains the temperature at the setting you select. A variation is the “heat pump,” a type of system that functions as heater and air conditioner.
Beware these aluminum clad wood doors. The wood is particle board. Why would anyone make a storm door out of particle board? They don't seal it in any way, it gets wet between the aluminum cladding and boils and blisters the aluminum and looks terrible in just a few years. I have two Larson's and they were horrible doors almost from the start. I've seen reviews and EMCO is the exact same way. When your storm door needs a storm door, you bought the wrong door.

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