Shortly thereafter, the first private home to have air conditioning was built in Minneapolis in 1914, owned by Charles Gates.[11] Realizing that air conditioning would one day be a standard feature of private homes, particularly in regions with warmer climate, David St. Pierre DuBose (1898-1994) designed a network of ductwork and vents for his home Meadowmont, all disguised behind intricate and attractive Georgian-style open moldings.[when?] This building is believed to be one of the first private homes in the United States equipped for central air conditioning.[12]
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A type of air conditioning system using a water/glycol solution as a condensing medium. Typically, the glycol-cooled condenser is located inside the air conditioner with the rest of the refrigeration components.  Water/glycol is piped to the unit from a drycooler or other suitable source. The glycol keeps the solution from freezing during winter operation.
If your unit isn't turning on, check on it outside to make sure the condenser is still running. Ensure it's fully plugged in and that your thermostat is set. Lower the thermostat by a few more degrees than your typical setting. You should hear it power on after doing so. If that doesn't take care of the problem, check your fuse box. You could have a blown fuse or a tripped circuit that's causing the air conditioner to not turn on.
The contactor (relay) and start/run capacitor(s) (see illustration below) fail most often and are inexpensive. So it’s a safe bet to buy and install those parts right away, especially if your air conditioning service unit is older than five years. The condenser fan motor can also fail, but it runs about $150 — hold off buying that unless you’re sure that’s the culprit.
"I was experiencing problems with one of my rooms not getting enough air flow, I was reached out to and they got a better feel for what my situation was and gave me the best honest opinion about what I should do, I really appreciate their professionalism in the manner and not just trying to gain my business. They really looked out for me as a customer, and I couldn’t be more grateful!"

An air conditioner's compressor contains a refrigerant. As it works, it sends this refrigerant through the system. As warm air blows across the coil that carries this refrigerant, the heat transfers to the refrigerant (cool always absorbs warm). A fan moves the cooled air through the ducting and out of vents that lead into the rooms of your house. The refrigerant returns to the compressor where the absorbed heat is moved outside. The refrigerant is then sent through the coil once again to continue the cycle.

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